Date | March 17-18, 2021
Time | 4 - 7 p.m.
Cost | $40

Program overview

The West Virginia Eating Disorder Network was developed in the summer of 2013 to provide a forum for providers of all disciplines to better understand and treat the complex challenges faced by clients with eating disorders. This conference is designed to review state-of-the-art clinical concepts and treatment considerations for individuals with disordered eating. It will also provide ample time for networking with other providers and treatment centers.

Health providers including psychiatrists, psychologists, licensed professional counselors, social workers, nurses, registered dietitians, addiction counselors and other interested professionals and students are invited to attend. There are no prerequisites. 

Jointly provided by the CAMC Health Education and Research Institute and The West Virginia Eating Disorder Network.

Register now!

Agenda

Introductions & Program Overview

Jessica Luzier, PhD, ABPP, CEDS | Clinical Director, WVU Disordered Eating Center of Charleston


Welcome

Senator Shelley Moore Capito


TOPIC | Screening, referral and ongoing management of eating disorders in primary care

Christine M. Peat, PhD, LP | Rebecka Peebles, MD

As the prevalence of eating disorders rises, access to evidence-based practice is dangerously limited. Despite the known consequences of eating disorders on physical (e.g., musculoskeletal, endocrine, immune, cardiovascular, and dental) and psychological health (e.g., suicide, comorbid substance use disorders, depression, anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder), only 20-57% of those with eating disorders ever receive treatment. Troublingly, treatment-seeking is even less likely among those from ethnic/racial minorities and those living outside urban areas. Barriers to care include: the stigma associated with eating disorders, limited availability of eating disorder specialists, the prohibitive cost of care, and poor mental health literacy by both health care providers and the general public.

Existing barriers to eating disorders specialty care highlight the important role of the primary care provider (PCP) in detecting these conditions. However, detecting eating disorders in primary care is not without its challenges. When patients do seek treatment for their eating disorder, they typically present to PCPs with other concerns such as physical health problems or other mental disorders often not even disclosing their eating disorder symptoms. Additionally, PCPs report limited knowledge about and comfort with treating eating disorders, despite expressing a desire for more comprehensive training.

An increase in eating disorder prevalence and an inadequate health care provider workforce converge to create a crisis in the eating disorders field. The current presentation aims to address this crisis by providing education and training in best practices for detecting, screening, and providing ongoing management for eating disorders in a primary care setting. Participants will learn practical skills and methods to apply in their practice to ensure that those with eating disorders are appropriately identified and provided with care.


Learning Objectives (Beginner to Intermediate)

  • Objective 1: Identify evidence-based screening measures and methods to detect eating disorders in primary care.
  • Objective 2: Describe the medical assessment and management of eating disorder diagnosis and barriers to eating disorder detection.
  • Objective 3: Describe evidence-based approaches to managing eating disorders in primary care.
  • Objective 4: Discuss best practices for collaborating within an eating disorders specialty team (e.g., therapist, dietitian, psychiatrist).

TOPIC | Identification and treatment of patients with eating disorders: A case-based approach

Jean Someshwar, MD

Feeding and eating problems in childhood and adolescence frequently cause consternation for both parents and providers, in differentiating self-limited developmental behaviors from eating disorders requiring multidisciplinary treatment intervention. Community studies evaluating patients with disordered eating behaviors showed up to 22% of youth affected, and with the application of strict diagnostic criteria, eating disorders in children and adolescents have an overall prevalence of around 4% in the US population. (Swanson et al, Prevalence and Correlates of Eating Disorders in Adolescents, Arch Gen Psych 2011 Jul; 68(7): 714-8723). Given the significant burden of morbidity and mortality in these patients, with anorexia nervosa having the highest mortality rate of any mental health disorder (Arcellus et al, Mortality Rates in patients with Anorexia Nervosa and other Eating Disorders, Arch Gen Psych 2011), prompt identification of patients with eating disorders is integral to care. Recently, the diagnostic criteria for Eating Disorders has been updated in the DSM-5 to include 6 separate entities and introduced severity ratings for anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder (Walsh, B. Diagnostic Categories for Eating Disorders, Psych Clin N Am 42 (2019)1-10.)

Knowledge of these criteria inform providers' ability to appropriately identify and refer patients for appropriate treatment, specific to their illness. The current presentation will utilize a case-based approach to review diagnostic categories of eating disorders, and to review current literature regarding best treatment practices for outpatient and inpatient care of patients with eating disorders.


Learning Objectives

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Identify patients meeting diagnostic criteria for specific eating disorders, and apply criteria to formally rate the severity of their illness.
  • Formulate an appropriate plan for evaluation and treatment for patients with eating disorders based on current evidence-based guidelines, and understand common barriers and complications with treatment.
  • Describe distinct treatment modalities for patients with eating disorders, and apply clinical data to select the most appropriate treatment for given patient presentations.
  • Describe prognostic factors impacting treatment outcomes in patients with eating disorders, and discuss interventions which may improve outcomes.

Accreditation

In support of improving patient care, this activity has been planned and implemented by the WVUDECC and CAMC Health Education and Research Institute. CAMC Health Education and Research Institute is jointly accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACGME), the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), to provide continuing education for the health care team.

CAMC Health Education and Research Institute designates this live virtual activity for a maximum of 6 AMA PRA Category 1 credit(s)TM. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in this activity.

CAMC Health Education and Research Institute is an approved provider of continuing nurse education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. This offering has been approved for 6 contact hours. (JA0026-22-21-303) Expiration date is 2 years from the course date.

The CAMC Health Education and Research Institute is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education. To receive credit, participants must complete the sign-in sheet, attend each session and complete an evaluation. ACPE credits will be posted online to the CPE Monitor within six (6) weeks following the activity. This knowledge based activity provides 6 contact hours JA0006133-9999-21-004-L04-P.

The CAMC Health Education and Research Institute is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. CAMC Health Education and Research Institute maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

The West Virginia Board of Examiners in Counseling has approved this course for 6.0 LPC contact hours. (WVBEC-031721)

Completion of this RD/DTR profession-specific or IPCE activity awards CPEUs (One IPCE credit = One CPEU). If the activity is dietetics-related but not targeted to RDs or DTRs, CPEUs may be claimed which are commensurate with participation in contact hours (One 60 minute hour = 1 CPEU). RDs and DTRs are to select activity type 102 in their Activity Log. Performance Indicator selection is at the learner's discretion.

The CAMC Health Education and Research Institute is an approved provider of continuing education by the West Virginia Board of Social Work Examiners. This program has been approved for 6 hours of social work credit. Approval number #490045.

The CAMC Institute is an approved provider of continuing education by the West Virginia Certification Board for Addiction and Prevention Professionals. This program is approved for 6 CEUs. Approval #AP-17-114.

Program faculty and planning committee

  • Jessica Luzier, PhD, ABPP, CEDS | Conference Chair
    • Clinical Director, WVU Disordered Eating Center of Charleston (Charleston, WV)
  • Christine M. Peat, PhD, LP
    • Director, National Center of Excellence for Eating Disorders - University of North Caroline at Chapel Hill (Chapel Hill, NC)
  • Rebecka Peebles, MD
    • Craig Dalsimer Division of Adolescent Medicine and Department of Pediatrics - Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, PA)
    • Director of Research and Quality Innovations - Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (Philadelphia, PA)
  • Jean Someshwar, MD
    • Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Division Chief of Adolescent Medicine - West Virginia University School of Medicine (Morgantown, WV)

Presenter Backgrounds

Dr. Christine Peat is the Director of the National Center of Excellence for Eating Disorders (NCEED) and an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She completed her undergraduate training in psychology at the University of Arizona and earned her master's degree and doctorate in clinical psychology at the University of North Dakota. Her internship was in behavioral medicine at West Virginia University, after which she went on to complete her postdoctoral fellowship in eating disorders research at the University of North Carolina under the directorship of Dr. Cynthia Bulik. As the Director of NCEED, Dr. Peat is focused on broadly disseminating education and training on eating disorders to health care providers across a variety of disciplines. Her research centers on eating pathology across the spectrum, but with a distinct focus on binge-eating disorder. She is particularly interested in the intersection between obesity, bariatric surgery, and eating pathology and investigating physiological comorbidities associated with eating disorders.

Dr. Peat is also a licensed psychologist in North Carolina and as such, treats eating disorders across the spectrum, with a primary focus on binge eating. Given her background in behavioral medicine, she has also established clinical services in GI Surgery where she provides both psychotherapy and behavioral medicine interventions to these patient populations. In addition to her clinical and research responsibilities, Dr. Peat is also a clinical supervisor for pre-doctoral psychology interns, psychiatry residents, and mentors undergraduate students.

Dr. Rebecka Peebles is the Director of Research and Quality Innovations of the Eating Disorder Assessment and Treatment Program at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. She is an Assistant Professor in the Craig Dalsimer Division of Adolescent Medicine and the Department of Pediatrics at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. She is a pediatrician with expertise in the medical complications of eating disorders in children and adolescents. Her research focuses on the impact of maladaptive eating behaviors and weight regulation on cardiometabolic markers, bone health, and body composition, and she has been funded by the American Heart Association, the National Institutes of Health, and private foundations. She also works to use quality improvement data to establish evidence-based treatment algorithms for inpatient and outpatient care of young people with eating disorders.

Dr. Someshwar is an Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Division Chief of Adolescent Medicine at West Virginia University in Morgantown, WV.

She completed her pediatric residency training at the University of Missouri-Columbia, and WVU in Morgantown and remained as pediatric faculty at WVU in Morgantown for over 10 years before completing an adolescent medicine fellowship at Children's National Health System, where she remained as adolescent medicine faculty until returning to WVU first at Martinsburg, from 2018-2020, then relocated to her current position in Morgantown in 2020. Currently, she is working with the Eating Disorders Interdisciplinary Treatment team (EDIT) to provide outpatient and medical stabilization inpatient services for patients with eating disorders.

Her clinical research interests include transition of care in patients with eating disorders, and identification and treatment of patients with eating disorders in the context of college health.

Virtual Exhibits

Cancellations and substitutions policy

You may cancel your registration up to 10 business days before the program and we will refund your full registration. If you need to cancel less than 10 business days prior to the program, you may:

  1. Send a substitute from your organization, or
  2. Transfer your registration fee to another program of your choice that is scheduled within 12 months of your original event.

Please note: if you don't cancel and don't attend, you are still responsible for payment.

Disclosure

It is the policy of the CAMC Institute that any faculty (speaker) who makes a presentation at a program designated for AMA Physician's Recognition Award (PRA) Category I or II credit must disclose any financial interest or other relationship (i.e. grants, research support, consultant, honoraria) that faculty member or spouse/partner has with the manufacturer(s) of any commercial product(s) that may be discussed in the educational presentation.

Program planning committee members must also disclose any financial interest or relationship with commercial industry that may influence their participation in this conference. All faculty and planning committee members have disclosed that no relationships exist.